IoT meets BioHacking: Communicating with devices and applications using the microchip in my hand

By ~AdamMiltonBarker | Date 2016-02-06 | Views 8924

  

  

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IoT meets BioHacking: Communicating with devices and applications using the microchip in my hand #IoT #InternetOfThings #BioHacking #Trashumanism #Cyborgs #DangerousThings #WorldMakerChallenge #GlobalMobileInnovatorsTournament #Glovators

  

  

One of the main disruptive technologies that I have been involved in is the IoT, or Internet of Things.  I am also a believer in Transhumanism and I research into, and develop methods that allow for the integration of technology with the human body. This subject is a very controversial one, with many people believing that this type of technology is related to the New World Order, and religious people believing it is related to the antichrist, but this is not the case, all of the people that I know that are involved with this type of technology do it help us evolve and security/privacy is one of their main concerns.



Recently I found out about a company in the United States called DangerousThings that provide state of the art biohacking products. DangerousThings believe our bodies are our own, to do with what we want, and biohacking is a new kind of evolution. They provide safe gear, safe procedures, and work with talented revolutionaries pushing the envelope of human experience. I came across the xNTi chip and immediately ideas flowed through my mind of how I could integrate this type of technology into my own development projects. The idea of becoming a cyborg really appealed to me, so I went ahead and took the first steps by ordering the kit from dangerousthings.com



DangerousThings.com



The kit came very quickly and I had spoken with DangerousThings founder Amal DT Graafstra and found out what I needed to know. I was advised to find a qualified piercer or doctor to make the implant, but unfortunately that was a hard task to accomplish. As this is a totally new area of technology here in Spain, I was unable to find anyone that felt comfortable injecting the microchip into my hand. After about a month of not finding anyone, I decide to take the risk and implant it myself into my hand. This was a very risky thing to do and I do not recommend this to anyone else, if you are thinking of getting an implant, please follow the advice provided by DangerousThings and have a professional do it for you. 



After calming my nerves I took the plunge and injected the device into the area of flesh between my thumb and first finger on my left hand. The process was very quick, much quicker than the build up to the event.  I do have a video of the process but I do not want to share it as the tools I used were pretty much what I could find lying around the house, including a pair of pliers to hold my skin up so I could inject the microchip into my hand. The chip and the syringe that were provided in the kit were both sterilized and I used the wipes to sterilize the tools I used and the workspace. Once I had completed the implant I panicked for about 10 minutes wondering what would happen if my hand fell off, but the panic wore off pretty quickly once I realized I was the first cyborg I knew, and in fact the first one to my knowledge in my area of Spain.



Previously I had been working on an IoT device that allowed me to authenticate onto the TechBubble Technologies GUI using NFC chips. This project was originally thought of to begin to move away from password authentication and increase the security of the TechBubble Technologies EcoSystem. This was my first application that would allow me to use the microchip implanted into my hand to access the GUI, I quickly scanned my microchip into the device I had created which connected my unique identifier to my account. The first tests were successful and I could now access the GUI without using any password securely.



The second and third projects I created that would allow me to use the microchip were part of my project entries for the IBM Global Mobile Innovators Tournament where I was one of the semi finalists, and the Microsoft / Arduino / Hackster World Maker Challenge where I was one of the phase 1 winners. With these projects I combined artificial intelligence, IoT and biohacking, I developed a Windows application that could be spoken to to monitor and send commands to IoT devices I had created. One of these devices was an NFC authentication device that could communicate with the Windows Application and the TechBubble GUI to allow me to authenticate onto the network to manage my devices.



In the videos below you can see the systems in action and me using the microchip implanted in my hand to access the network, I will be continuing my research into other ways that my chip can help make my life easier and will be developing more systems over the next year. I am currently working on a device that allows me to turn lights on using the chip and the next stage is to create security locks for doors and windows.



This type of technology is becoming more and more mainstream. I understand people have their concerns about this type of technology but ask that anyone with negative views or that are quick to criticize to please check out my history in the development world and understand that my life as a developer has been dedicated to protecting people's security and helping others learn and enhance their capabilities through my technology and articles.



Again I must stress that anyone that is interested in getting an implant should not follow my lead and even attempt to implant the chip themselves, although in my case it went well, it could very easily gone very wrong and could of even made me lose my hand, so please make sure you get a professional to carry out the procedure. 



Please check out my videos below and feel free to ask any questions.


  

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